Table of Contents
  1. Apricot Butter Recipe

Jams, jellies, and preserves are all a variation on the combination of fruit and pectin to create a wonderful spread. The difference between each is the form and function the fruit takes:

  • Jelly is made from fruit juice and has none of the “pieces.”
  • Jam is created from crushed fruit and thus, has a pulpy texture.
  • Preserves have chunks of fruit.

I’m going to throw in another category that many may not be used to: fruit butter! This is a completely different concept for preserving fruit but has become one of my personal favorites. It’s thick, smooth, sweet, and utterly delectable. As a bonus, it’s easy and fast, with a nearly foolproof recipe consisting of just two ingredients:

  • 4 cups fruit
  • 4 cups sugar

This can be adapted to any measurement or amount of fruit you have. Just make sure to remember the mantra of equal parts sugar to fruit and you’re ready! This may sound too good to be true but it isn’t. Fruit butter will be a different consistency than the jams and jellies you may be accustomed to. While jelly has an almost gelatin quality, fruit butter is somewhat thinner but packed with so much more of the fruit flavors.

Four glass jars filled with apricot butter on a dark black surface

NOTE: This recipe can be adapted for many different fruits. I find it best for grape butter, apricot butter, and peach butter.

You cannot have a more easy or simple way to preserve your fruit for use as spreads and in recipes. This apricot butter is a great way to prolong the best part of the summer season: the bounty the earth provides. Just a warning, though: your friends will want to know where to find it and you’ll have the privilege of showing off your kitchen skills. Enjoy!

If you make this recipe, make sure to leave me a comment and a rating of the recipe so I know how it worked out for you! You can also tag me on Instagram with a picture of the final product.

Orange-colored apricot butter in four glass jars sitting on a black surface

Apricot Butter

3.38 from 8 votes
In this fruit butter, apricots and sugar combine to form a sweet, jam-like spread. Two ingredients have never tasted so good together!
Prep Time 15 mins
Cook Time 1 hr
Total Time 1 hr 15 mins
Servings 4 jam jars

Ingredients

  • 4 cups apricots
  • 4 cups sugar

Instructions
 

  • To start, clean and prepare the fruit. Halve the fruit and remove pits and any abrasions, leaving the peel intact. This is where the flavor comes from. Measure fruit by pressing it into a measuring cup. Do not simply lay fruit in or the measurements will not be accurate.
    Apricots sitting in a pile in a black-lined kettle on the stove
  • Dump fruit in a heavy-bottomed kettle and add an equal amount of sugar.
    Sugar pouring on top of pile of apricots sitting in kettle on the stove
  • Turn the heat to medium and stir contents to bring out the natural juices and dissolve the sugar. Increase the heat to medium-high and let the mixture come to a boil. Bring to a rolling boil (a boil that cannot be stirred down), letting the mixture begin to foam.
    Cooked apricots in liquid in a kettle on the stove
  • Once at a rolling boil, set a timer for 20 minutes. Stir and let boil. While boiling, watch the mixture carefully as it will rise and eventually fall, cooking down and causing the foam to dissipate.
    Boiling apricot butter liquid in black kettle on the stove
  • After 20 minutes, turn off the heat. Pour directly into a conical strainer that has been placed in a container; a 9×13 pan works well. This will hold the butter as it runs out the bottom of the strainer.
    A conical strainer may be a new utensil for you but is a very tried-and-true multi-purpose canning tool.
    Apricot butter mixture being poured into a conical strainer set over a 9x13 pan
  • Use a wooden pestle in a circular motion to push the apricot butter through the strainer. Only a small amount of peel and other remnants will be left in the strainer once it has been vigorously pushed through.
    Apricot butter mixture spilling out of bottom of conical strainer into a 9x13 silver metal pan
  • Stir the fruit butter and pour directly into sanitized jam jars.
    Four glass jars filled with apricot butter on a dark black surface
  • Next, either can or use the wax method to seal the jars. To use the wax method, melt wax on a low-heat burner and pour over apricot butter. Lightly swirl to create a seal.

Notes

  • When using the wax method, this apricot butter can be kept in a refrigerator or freezer for up to a year.
  • I also used the wax method in my strawberry jam recipe, so make sure to hop on over there to watch a demonstration of this method.
  • You can also can this apricot butter. Make sure to watch my canning 101 video and my canned grape butter recipe for more!

Nutrition

Serving: 1tbspCalories: 53kcalCarbohydrates: 13.6gProtein: 0.1gFat: 0gSaturated Fat: 0gTrans Fat: 0gCholesterol: 0mgSodium: 0.2mgFiber: 0.2gSugar: 13.4g
Course Spreads
Cuisine American
Difficulty Intermediate
Method Canning
Sugar pouring on top of pile of apricots sitting in kettle on the stove
Add sugar on top of halved peaches before heating on the stove.
Cooked apricots in liquid in a kettle on the stove
Let apricot and sugar mixture come to a rolling bowl on stove.
Boiling apricot butter liquid in black kettle on the stove
Once at a rolling bowl, let boil for 20 minutes.
Apricot butter mixture being poured into a conical strainer set over a 9x13 pan
Pour into a conical strainer (affiliate link) to strain out all excess skins and other pieces.
Apricot butter mixture sitting in a conical strainer with wooden pestle all over a 9x13 pan catching all liquid
Use a wooden pestle to strain out all apricot butter mixture.
Apricot butter mixture spilling out of bottom of conical strainer into a 9x13 silver metal pan
Let apricot butter mixture drip out of the bottom of the conical strainer (affiliate link) into the 9×13 pan.

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Kaleb

I’m Kaleb! I'm not a chef, professional baker, landscaper, or designer, but I like to play each on Knollgate Farm. Come join me on my journey and let's learn together!

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13 Comments

    1. Thanks Pamela!! So glad you enjoyed it, it really does taste like all the goodness of summer in a spread!!

  1. I made your butter but i didnt sieve out the peelings. I used my immersion blender and blended it all in,

    1. How did that turn out Flo??
      I make cookies with apricot butter, and it is always a challenge to find it. Finding a recipe to make it myself is great!

  2. 5 stars
    Thank you so much for this recipe. It’s delicious! I was so excited to find and try this recipe and it did not disappoint. I’ve only ever made freezer jams and was glad this process was easy and the wax seal method was much less daunting than canning. I look forward to eating lots of white bread with butter and apricot butter and reliving fond childhood memories.

  3. 4 stars
    Looks good, for a jam recipe. Historically the purpose of a “butter” is to reduce the fruit to let the natural sugar come thru, butters came about because folks didn’t have enough sugar/honey to make jelly/jam.

  4. Please add phot of how the peach butter looks when spreading. I usually bake mine to get the texture….like a typical apple butter in the store. I have bought some recently that are more like a canned pie filling….which i do not like.

    Will be making this week!
    Thank you
    Vicky

  5. Help…sitting here with the butter in my jars…how long in boiling water bath?help….eeded now….i dont want to ruin 20lbs of fruit tonite