Table of Contents
  1. Why this recipe works.
  2. Everything you’ll need to make this recipe.
  3. Here’s how to make this recipe.
  4. These pro tips will make this recipe a success.
  5. Frequently asked questions about this recipe.
  6. You'll love these other jam and butter recipes.
  7. Watch how to make this recipe.
  8. Have I convinced you to make this recipe?
  9. How to Can Strawberry Butter Recipe

Unlike the jam alternative, strawberry butter is a delicious, spreadable sauce that can’t be beaten. Made from fresh fruit, it’s a super simple recipe made with only four ingredients. While it can be kept fresh in the refrigerator, this butter is especially good when it’s canned for shelf-stable storage. Either way, there’s never a better time than now to make this recipe.

Why this recipe works.

Fruit butter is not something we run to the refrigerator for anymore. All fruit spreads have slowly morphed into each other, and the usual jam or jelly is used as the common denominator when needing something sweet and fruity to spread over toast. To make them at home, it is important to know each one has a purpose and is different:

  • Jelly is clear, made with fruit juice, and thickened with pectin.
  • Jam and preserves are made with pieces of fruit and juice and can be thickened with pectin or left natural.
  • Fruit butter uses the entire fruit, mashing it down and cooking, leaving no need for pectin.

Fruit butter is my choice when preserving any fruit into a spread. The resulting butter is thick and viscous without any thickening agent. The word butter is used to describe the consistency of butter at room temperature, the same spreadable texture as a fruit butter. The total time is quick, and the flavor is left intact. Once you try this, you will never want anything else.

Tan colored plate with slice of bread with butter and strawberry jam slathered on top all on marble surface with more jam jars to the side.

Everything you’ll need to make this recipe.

  • Strawberries will always have the best flavor when picked locally and in season. Starting with the best berries possible will create the most flavor in the spread.
  • Sugar works to both sweeten and thicken the butter and is definitely necessary in order to create the correct texture.
  • Lemon juice helps to add brightness to the butter while enhancing the flavor of the strawberries.
  • Vanilla beans impart a full vanilla flavor instead of a traditional vanilla extract.
White marble surface filled with four ingredients needed to make strawberry butter including strawberries, lemon, white sugar, and vanilla beans.

Here’s how to make this recipe.

  1. Mash the strawberries. Hull the strawberries to remove the top. Then place in a large heavy-bottom kettle. Add the sugar, lemon juice, and vanilla beans, slicing the beans to expose the vanilla bean seeds inside. Using a masher, mash the strawberries until a decent amount of liquid has collected at the bottom of the kettle.
  1. Cook the strawberries. Place the kettle on the stove and bring it to a rolling boil. A rolling boil is a boil that cannot be tamed even when it is stirred. Once at a rolling boil, turn the heat down slightly and let the mixture cook to condense. If canning the strawberry butter, have a kettle filled with water and fitted with a wire rack. Bring the water to a boil and sterilize the jars. When the butter has fully cooked, use a spoon to remove any of the foam. Also, remove the vanilla beans.
  1. Blend the mixture. Once the mixture has condensed, remove it from the heat. Using an immersion blender or canister blended, purée the mixture until smooth.
  1. Pour into jars. Using a funnel and ladle, pour the butter into the sterilized half-pint jars, leaving ½-inch headspace at the top. Once all of the jars are filled, use a paper towel dabbed in a bit of hot water to wipe off the top of each jar. Place on the lid and ring and twist to fingertip tightness.

What is headspace?

Headspace is the unoccupied area at the top of a jar. This space allows the contents of the jar to shift and expand during the canning process without impeding the seal created by the lid and ring. It also allows for the creation of a vacuum seal.

  1. Can the butter. Using a jar lifter, place all of the jars into a large kettle filled with boiling water and a metal rack on the bottom. Make sure that the top of each jar is covered by an inch of water. Process for the appropriate time (see below). Once they’re processed, use a jar lifter to remove the jars from the kettle, tilting each one to remove any water on the top. Let the jars sit for 24 hours without being disturbed to ensure each jar seals. After 24 hours, remove the rings and store them in a cool, dark place.

Each altitude can require a different processing time. I’m located between 0 and 1,000 feet above sea level. If you are at a different elevation, make sure to check the USDA Canning Guide (see page 7-6) for your processing time:

Elevation0 to 1,000 ft1,001 to 6,000 ft6,000 ft +
Time5 minutes10 minutes15 minutes

These pro tips will make this recipe a success.

  • To save time, skip slicing the strawberries once they’re hulled. Since there is a long cooking time, there is no benefit to taking the time to slice each strawberry in half or in quarters. Simply let the masher and stove do all of the work.
  • While some recipes will instruct you to remove the foam from the butter as it’s boiling, I find that it’s best to wait until the end of the boiling to remove it. Some of the foam will dissipate as it continues to boil, increasing the overall amount of butter. The foam has air, which is not desirable when canning jam or butter.
  • To assess the texture of your strawberry butter, place a plate in the freezer. When ready to test, place some of the blended butter on the plate. Tilt the plate, letting the butter fall slowly. The cold will act as an indicator of what the consistency will be once it has cooled. If you draw your finger through the butter without it running back together, the butter is ready.
  • Make sure to wipe off the rim of each jar after ladling in the butter. This ensures that no spots of the butter are on the rim, leading to a faulty seal.
  • Removing the rings from each jar will ensure that the seal on each jar is correct. If the rings are left on, the jar could have a false seal, which would be unknown until the jar is later opened.
Open glass jam jar with spoon resting on rim with strawberry jam about to drip off with more strawberries to the side.

Frequently asked questions about this recipe.

Instead of vanilla beans, can vanilla extract be used instead?

Yes. Simply add two teaspoons of vanilla extract after the mixture has cooked on the stove.

Can a canister blender be used instead of a handheld immersion blender?

Yes, a canister blender will work to purée the butter. But always remember that if blending something hot, an opening must be left to vent off any of the steam. Depending on the size of the canister, this may need to be blended in batches.

Can this fruit butter be canned in any size jar?

Yes, but the processing times will vary depending on the size of the jar. 

Can this butter be placed in the refrigerator or freezer instead of being canned?

Yes, the butter can be stored in the refrigerator for three weeks or in the freezer for six months.

What should I do if one of the jars does not seal after being processed?

Store any unsealed jars in the refrigerator and use them as needed. They should last up to three weeks.

How long does the strawberry butter last on the shelf?

Once sealed, the butter will last at least one year. After one year, the color may begin to darken.

Watch how to make this recipe.

YouTube video

More preserve recipes to try

Have I convinced you to make this recipe?

I hope you make this recipe and put some food on your table. Leave a comment and share a star rating so you can let others know how much you love this recipe. This helps show others that this is a recipe they, too, can make, enjoy, and love!

Glass jam jars filled with strawberry butter sitting on marble surface with tile background with lids and rings on top.

How to Can Strawberry Butter

5 from 8 votes
Unlike the jam alternative, strawberry butter is a delicious, spreadable sauce that can’t be beaten. Made from fresh fruit, it’s a super simple recipe made with only four ingredients. While it can be kept fresh in the refrigerator, this butter is especially good when it’s canned for shelf-stable storage. Either way, there’s never a better time than now to make this recipe.
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 1 hour
Servings 48 servings

Ingredients

  • 3 lb strawberries cleaned and hulled
  • 1 ½ cups white granulated sugar
  • 2 tbsp lemon juice
  • 2 whole vanilla beans sliced in half lengthwise

Instructions
 

  • Place the cleaned and hulled strawberries in a large 6-quart heavy-bottomed stock pot or Dutch oven. Add the sugar and lemon juice. Use a potato masher to roughly mash the fruit and draw out the juice to mix with the sugar. Add the sliced vanilla beans and place over medium heat. If canning, have the water bath, jars, lids, and rings ready.
    3 lb strawberries, 1 ½ cups white granulated sugar, 2 tbsp lemon juice, 2 whole vanilla beans
  • Slowly bring the mixture to a boil, stirring to ensure the sugar is not sticking to the bottom and is dissolving. Once boiling, combine to stir and boil until it is at a rolling boil. A rolling boil is a boil that will not stop when stirring and continues to boil. Adjust heat as needed to keep the rolling boil for 20 minutes. Skim any foam that forms on top off and set it aside.
  • Once the mixture has boiled for 20 minutes, remove it from the heat. Pull out the vanilla beans and squeeze out any remaining seeds from the middle into the mixture. Using an immersion blender or canister blender, blend the mixture until smooth.
  • Pour the strawberry butter into prepared 8-oz jars. If storing in the refrigerator or freezer, pour into containers and cool. If canning, water bath the jars for 10 minutes. Once the jars are finished, remove them from the water bath. Cool for 12 hours before removing the rings to check the integrity of the seal.

Notes

  • To save time, skip slicing the strawberries once they’re hulled. Since there is a long cooking time, there is no benefit to taking the time to slice each strawberry in half or in quarters. Simply let the masher and stove do all of the work.
  • While some recipes will instruct you to remove the foam from the butter as it’s boiling, I find that it’s best to wait until the end of the boiling to remove it. Some of the foam will dissipate as it continues to boil, increasing the overall amount of butter. The foam has air, which is not desirable when canning jam or butter.
  • To assess the texture of your strawberry butter, place a plate in the freezer. When ready to test, place some of the blended butter on the plate. Tilt the plate, letting the butter fall slowly. The cold will act as an indicator of what the consistency will be once it has cooled. If you draw your finger through the butter without it running back together, the butter is ready.
  • Make sure to wipe off the rim of each jar after ladling in the butter. This ensures that no spots of the butter are on the rim, leading to a faulty seal.
  • Removing the rings from each jar will ensure that the seal on each jar is correct. If the rings are left on, the jar could have a false seal, which would be unknown until the jar is later opened.

Nutrition

Serving: 1tbspCalories: 33kcal
Course Spreads
Cuisine American
Difficulty Easy
Method Canning

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Kaleb

I’m Kaleb! I'm not a chef, professional baker, landscaper, or designer, but I like to play each on Knollgate Farm. Come join me on my journey and let's learn together!

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9 Comments

  1. 5 stars
    Wow! Perfect timing. I just retired and decided to start canning again after a 15 year break. This was the perfect recipe to start with, and it is delicious. I can hardly wait to open the first jar. Thanks for the wonderful detailed instruction.

  2. I really want to try this recipe with strawberries, however I have an abundance of figs. Can 3 lbs of figs be substituted for the strawberries? I have also watched your crockpot pear butter. Could figs be substituted for that one as well? Thanks. We love your videos, recipes, and how you clearly present your content!

  3. 5 stars
    kaleb, another great recipe as usual..I’m on my second batch..can’t wait to get these as gifts along with the rhubarb butter. i think i will make some homemade bread to add to the gifts..thx again

  4. 5 stars
    I love this. It’s nice to have a lower sugar alternative to grocery store jam/jelly. I used frozen strawberries and it turned out great.

  5. Kaleb!!! I tried this for the first time this week. Holy Smokes!!! This is dangerous-it’s all I want to eat!!! Thank you so much! I was wondering if this recipe can be made with frozen cherries? I’m all about the butters now! I will try the pear butter next. Thank you!!!! I love canning just like you and I get so excited seeing your joy in your videos.

  6. 5 stars
    I have made this several times and i’m completely addicted!! I’m not even a huge strawberry fan and I can’t get enough! Thanks so much for the recipe!! I also need help because asI said i’ve made this several times and it came out perfect, well this time it’s runny!! Help, how do I fix this!!???