Table of Contents
  1. Why I love this recipe.
  2. Everything you’ll need to make this recipe.
  3. Here’s how to make this recipe.
  4. These pro tips will make this recipe a success.
  5. Frequently asked questions about this recipe.
  6. You'll love these other Easter recipes.
  7. Watch how to make this recipe.
  8. Have I convinced you to make this recipe?
  9. Citrus Glazed Ham Recipe

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Making a ham is not complicated, yet it adds so much to a large meal. In this recipe, a bright orange and lemon glaze enhances the flavor of a cured ham, perfect for an Easter meal. This traditional centerpiece takes little preparation and will quickly become the talk of the table.

Why I love this recipe.

At one time, lamb was the traditional choice for Easter meals. After WWII, wool decreased in demand, the price of lamb increased, and ham became the more economical choice. Now, ham is the traditional main dish for most Easter meals. Ham is a great option. There is little required to make a good ham, but that is the key. Start with a good quality ham, and 90% of the work is already finished. This recipe nearly enhances the smoky cured flavor of the meat with a perfect glaze that is also served as a sauce. Sweet and slightly bitter orange marmalade is the base of the glaze, mixed with fresh citrus juice and rosemary for a balanced glaze that creates a crisp exterior on the ham. The flavor compliments the rich ham and is perfect for a spring-centered meal.

White oval serving platter with ham with slices laying to the side along with orange glaze in small bowl.

Everything you’ll need to make this recipe.

  • Ham already has a rich, cured flavor. Choose a good quality ham with natural juice. If water is added, the flavor can be reduced.
  • Orange marmalade is a sweet jam with a slightly bitter tanginess that balances the sugar.
  • Orange zest and lemon zest add more bright citrus to enhance the marmalade.
  • Fresh rosemary is the perfect herb to stand against the rich flavor of ham and cut through the marmalade.
White marble surface filled with all ingredients needed for citrus glazed ham including ham, orange and lemon, Dijon mustard, and more.

Here’s how to make this recipe.

  1. Cook the ham. Place the ham cut side down in a baking dish. Cover with tin foil. Place in a 350°F oven for about 2 hours, until the internal temperature reaches 135°F, about 10°F below its finished temperature.
  1. Create the glaze. In a small sauce pan, pour in the orange marmalade and Dijon mustard. Squeeze in the orange and lemon. Add the rosemary and whisk together. Place over medium-high heat and bring to a simmer, about 3 minutes.
  1. Glaze the ham. Using a brush, cover the ham with about ⅓ cup of the prepared glaze. Place back into the oven uncovered at 400°F for 15 to 18 minutes, until it reaches an internal temperature of 145°F. Remove and let sit for 5 to 10 minutes before carving and serving.

These pro tips will make this recipe a success.

  • Using a good bone-in ham will work well with this recipe. It allows you to cut it any way you desire. If you prefer, you can use a spiral-cut ham, which is pre-sliced.
  • After the initial roasting of the ham, drain off the excess liquid. Leaving the liquid in the pan does not create an issue, but removing it makes for a better presentation.
  • Glazing the ham when it is 10°F before its final finished temperature is essential. This allows time for the glaze to adhere in the final 10°F of cooking without having to worry as much about the glaze burning on the surface of the ham. If the glaze were added at the beginning of heating, it would be on the surface of the ham for too long. If it were added when the ham had reached its final temperature, the glaze would not be warmed through and create the desired finished texture.
Slices of ham laying on top of each other showing texture of the meat all on white serving platter.

Frequently asked questions about this recipe.

What type of ham should be purchased for this recipe?

A bone-in ham with natural juices will be the most flavorful.

Can the glaze be prepared ahead of time?

Yes, the glaze can be prepared three days ahead and stored in the refrigerator until ready to be used.

Can the leftover liquid from roasting be used in some way?

A “broth” forms in the pan while the ham is roasting. The broth will be richly flavored and can be used in soup, gravy, or frozen for future use.

How long does the ham last after preparation?

The leftovers should be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator. They will last for 7 to 10 days or can be frozen for up to 3 months.

Small black bowl filled with citrus glaze with spoon resting inside with ham to the side.

Watch how to make this recipe.

More Easter recipes to try

Have I convinced you to make this recipe?

I hope you make this recipe and put some food on your table. Leave a comment and share a star rating so you can let others know how much you love this recipe. This helps show others that this is a recipe they, too, can make, enjoy, and love!

White oval platter filled with slices of ham with rest of ham in the background along with small black bowl filled with orange marmalade glaze.

Citrus Glazed Ham

5 from 1 vote
Making a ham is not complicated, yet it adds so much to a large meal. In this recipe, a bright orange and lemon glaze enhances the flavor of a cured ham, perfect for an Easter meal. This traditional centerpiece takes little preparation and will quickly become the talk of the table.
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 2 hours 18 minutes
Total Time 2 hours 33 minutes
Servings 8 servings

Ingredients

  • 3-4 lb cured ham (bone-in preferred)
  • 1 cup orange marmalade
  • 2 tbsp Dijon mustard
  • ¾ tsp kosher salt
  • ½ tsp black pepper
  • 2 tbsp orange juice
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice
  • 1 tbsp minced fresh rosemary

Instructions
 

  • Prepare ham according to the heating instructions accompanying the meat. Cover with foil and bake in a preheated 350°F oven until the internal temperature reads 135°F, about 2 hours.
    3-4 lb cured ham (bone-in preferred)
  • While heating the ham, prepare the glaze. In a small kettle, combine the marmalade, Dijon mustard, salt, black pepper, orange juice, lemon juice, and rosemary. Stir and bring to a simmer over medium-high heat. Simmer for 3 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside until ready to use.
    1 cup orange marmalade, 2 tbsp Dijon mustard, ¾ tsp kosher salt, ½ tsp black pepper, 2 tbsp orange juice, 1 tbsp lemon juice, 1 tbsp minced fresh rosemary
  • When the ham reaches 135°F, remove from oven, discard foil, and heat oven to 400°F.
  • Spoon or brush ⅓ cup of the glaze over the ham and transfer to the 400°F oven. Roast until the ham reaches an internal temperature of 145°F and the glaze caramelizes slightly, about 15-18 minutes. Watch closely to ensure the glaze does not burn. Tent with foil if needed. Remove ham and rest under foil for 10 minutes. Slice and serve with additional glaze.

Notes

Using a good bone-in ham will work well with this recipe. It allows you to cut it any way you desire. If you prefer, you can use a spiral-cut ham, which is pre-sliced.
After the initial roasting of the ham, drain off the excess liquid. Leaving the liquid in the pan does not create an issue, but removing it makes for a better presentation.
Glazing the ham when it is 10°F before its final finished temperature is essential. This allows time for the glaze to adhere in the final 10°F of cooking without having to worry as much about the glaze burning on the surface of the ham. If the glaze were added at the beginning of heating, it would be on the surface of the ham for too long. If it were added when the ham had reached its final temperature, the glaze would not be warmed through and create the desired finished texture.

Nutrition

Serving: 1servingCalories: 401kcal
Course Dinner
Cuisine American
Difficulty Intermediate
Method Baking

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Kaleb

I’m Kaleb! I'm not a chef, professional baker, landscaper, or designer, but I like to play each on Knollgate Farm. Come join me on my journey and let's learn together!

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5 from 1 vote (1 rating without comment)

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1 Comments

  1. Tin foil! You got that phrase from your mother and your grandmother. I love it! In honor of them, I will make this recipe on Easter Sunday. I know it will be wonderful. Thank you!