Thanksgiving Centerpiece

Thanksgiving Centerpiece | The Gray Boxwood

We are in an age where is seems us homebodies either do one of two things: (1) try to live up to magazine expectations of a perfect holiday with over-the-top presentations and gourmet foods, or (2) we feel like failures, give up, and put no effort into our holiday gatherings. Speaking from personal experience, I know that it’s easy to become burned out in this upcoming time of year. There are so many functions going on and so much family to see. All too often, all at once, it’s over and we never really seemed to be able to enjoy it! Maybe this isn’t you but it used to be me. I loved the fantasy of a picture perfect holiday. I would see ideas in a magazine and want to replicate them to a T in my home. But the reality is that, as the season rushes in, none of us have endless hours to spend on each little detail.

Now I try and simplify my holidays, condensing them to the essentials so I can enjoy my family and friends and all the decorations I spend hours setting up. Don’t get me wrong – I still love the beauty of a well-set table; it’s definitely an essential! But this week, I decided to show you quick and simple ideas to have a beautiful tablescape without the hours spent setting it. The best part of a Thanksgiving table is that you can use so much of what is already in your yard and home! Natural elements fit perfectly into a Thanksgiving theme.

For this floral centerpiece, I went to my local grocery store and Costco and was able to find gorgeous and reasonable items. Not all of us can get to a flower market. This centerpiece is one that you’ll be able to replicate and make work for you!

GROCERY STORE CONTENTS:

  • 1 bunch lime green mums
  • 4 stems Hipernicum berries
  • 4 stems Status
  • 6 stems Eucalyptus with seeds

COSTCO CONTENTS:

  • 1 bunch amber-hued miniature sunflowers
  • 1 bunch fall garden mix

To start an arrangement, I always choose the vessel. This allows me to understand the size and space I have for my arrangement. This Thanksgiving will take place around a small table, so I wanted a low, less obtrusive piece. An old cast iron mortar was perfect.

Thanksgiving Centerpiece | The Gray Boxwood

Next, add water and a packet of flower food.

Thanksgiving Centerpiece | The Gray Boxwood

I like to first put some foliage in the vessel to provide a base and overall shape of the arrangement.

Thanksgiving Centerpiece | The Gray Boxwood

Trim the stems off all the flowers before you place them. I think the main mistake many people make is leaving the stems too long. Smaller, compact arrangements usually end up looking more professional. After placing the base foliage, place a few of the sunflowers to follow the shape of the Eucalyptus.

Thanksgiving Centerpiece | The Gray Boxwood

Next, start working in bunches, creating tight bundles of the mums, Status, and miscellaneous garden mix flowers. Bundling small flowers gives an overall larger impact. You’ll want to remove the leaves from each of the flowers so that the bunches are tight.

Thanksgiving Centerpiece | The Gray Boxwood

Thanksgiving Centerpiece | The Gray Boxwood

Finally, fill in any holes with Hipernicum berries and leftover sunflowers.

Thanksgiving Centerpiece | The Gray Boxwood

Thanksgiving Centerpiece | The Gray Boxwood

As you work, constantly turn the arrangement so you can see the result on all sides.

Thanksgiving Centerpiece | The Gray Boxwood

Thanksgiving Centerpiece | The Gray Boxwood

With the right pieces you can’t go wrong on a flower centerpiece. Thanksgiving lends itself to rustic and rough looks, so don’t be afraid to go outside your comfort zone. For a unique twist, try adding fruit or artichokes. They take a lot of space and look fantastic!

I hope this proves that great arrangements can be made by everyone with things found locally on your way home from work![hr]

Images by The Gray Boxwood[divider]

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.